Consumers Overwhelmingly Want Telemedicine to Be Part of Their Health Care

30% of consumers would consider changing physicians if their doctor didn’t offer telemedicine.

Flemington, NJ May 16, 2020: HCD Research conducted a study of American consumers to determine their perceptions and preferences related to telemedicine during the COVID-19 crisis.

The study was comprised of three segment populations: nonusers (people who have not had experience with telemedicine), ‘COVID-19’ users (people who have used telemedicine specifically due to the COVID-19 crisis), and ‘Non-COVID-19’ users (people who have used telemedicine independent of the COVID-19 crisis). The study revealed that the COVID-19 crisis has changed perceptions of telemedicine positively. Consumers who have used telemedicine tend to have more positive perceptions of telemedicine than nonusers and are more likely to use it in the future. However, 88% of nonusers still say they would be open to using telemedicine in the future.

Other observations included:

This study combined traditional survey questions with HCD’s MaxImplicit approach to understand perceptions of telemedicine and in-person appointments. To learn more about MaxImplicit, feel free to contact us via the info listed below or check out our available resources on YouTube & LinkedIn.

Consumers are overall more open to using telemedicine to communicate with their regular doctors rather than using a separate telehealth company/service, with 58% saying they are likely to use a telehealth company, compared to 82% saying they are likely to use a service that allows them to talk to a doctor from their regular practice. Telemedicine is perceived as being easy, helpful, and safe. Users find it to be safer, more reliable, and more convenient than in-person appointments, while for nonusers, comfort is still a big hurdle to using telemedicine.

More than half of consumers agree they will get the same level of care through both telemedicine and in-person appointments, although it is acknowledged that some situations (addressing pain, needing to take vitals, etc.) are best left for in-person. 

Moving forward, consumers would like to see more opportunities for telemedicine even after the Pandemic is over. Telemedicine may be an important feature of future medical practice as 30% of all respondents (41% of users) indicated that they would consider switching to another doctor if their doctor did not provide opportunities for telemedicine.

The study was sponsored by HCD Research as a service to the health care community.  For more information or an interview contact Rachel Horn, Marketing Research Manager at HCD Research, (rachel.horn@hcdi.net).